Beat the Summer Heat with 10 Water-Rich Foods - Rejuvenation Therapeutics Corp.

Beat the Summer Heat with 10 Water-Rich Foods

August 12, 2019

Beat the Summer Heat with 10 Water-Rich Foods

From soaring temperatures to scalding sunlight, a summer heatwave demands that we take appropriate measures to protect our bodies. However, we usually end up taking care of our health externally by applying sunscreen and wearing sunglasses, and we simply miss out on protecting our bodies from the inside.

Dehydration is one of the major health problems that affects us during these hot summer months. Dehydration is a common condition often experienced during the summer season in which the body can become completely deficient of water, which can lead to the disruption of metabolic processes. Dehydration can cause symptoms that range from mild — headaches, fatigue, and dizziness — to severe, which can include a serious problem such as hypernatremia — high levels of sodium ions in the blood.

Generally, we are advised to drink plenty of water in order to keep hydrated. However, drinking plenty of water is not the only solution to avoid dehydration. Here is a list of some readily available vegan foods that can help keep us hydrated, energized, and cool from within throughout these hot summer months:

    1. Watermelon: As the name suggests, watermelons are composed of approximately 91% water. A fruit readily available in the summer season, watermelons are not only excellent coolants but also are a good source of vitamins A and C.1 Incorporate them in your summer diet as a part of salads, make them into a fresh juice, or simply enjoy the whole fruit.
    2. Cantaloupe: Another fruit easily, and at times exclusively, available during summer, cantaloupe is a rich source of water and other vitamins and minerals. Composed of approximately 90% water, cantaloupes are also rich in vitamins C, E, and A.2 Normally relished as a whole fresh fruit, cantaloupes can be added to salads, as well as easily incorporated into desserts. One added advantage of cantaloupes is that after eating the fruit, you can preserve and dry its seeds in order to consume them as a snack.
    3. Pineapple: A fruit abundant in vitamin C, pineapple is also a rich source of water, with approximately 86% water content. Another nutrient present in high amounts in pineapples is manganese.3 Try including pineapple in your diet this summer, enjoy it raw, grilled, as a juice, or as part of fruit salads and fruit custards, or it can be added to some traditional gravies.
    4. Cucumber: Another summer food that is actually available all year round is cucumber, which contains around 96% water. Along with water, it also provides a good percentage of vitamins K and B5.4 In salads, sides, dips, or juices, and as part of many recipes, or simply by adding slices to your drinking water, cucumber can easily be made a part of summer diets.
    5. Zucchini: A summer squash, zucchini is another vegetable with high water content. It consists of more than 94% water and is a good source of folic acid and potassium.5 Zucchini has been used in various cuisines and has been a part of many traditional recipes. Zucchini can be added along with other vegetables to juices, soups, stews, and curries. It can also be eaten raw in salads, or it can be pickled or quickly cooked in oil to keep its juices intact.
    6. Oranges: An abundant source of vitamin C, oranges are an excellent source of water, containing around 82% water. Along with vitamin C and water, oranges also provide minerals such as potassium and calcium, and hence they help maintain an adequate electrolyte balance in the body.6 You can enjoy oranges in the form of juice, as part of a fruit salad, or simply eat it as a whole fruit.
    7. Coconut water: An abundant source of electrolytes and minerals, coconut water is one of the best ways to help keep you hydrated in the summer heat. It is a good source of potassium and sodium and has a negligible amount of fat and proteins.7 Try avoiding fizzy sugary drinks and replace them with healthy and nutritious coconut water.
    8. Onion: Onions are composed of approximately 89% water.8 Loaded with antioxidants, onions help boost our digestive system and immunity, thus helping to prevent sickness that can be caused by summer heat.9,10 Add them to a salad, or as a side to your meal — eating raw onions is one of the best ways to stay hydrated during the hot summer months.
    9. Celery: A fibrous vegetable composed of approximately 95% water, celery helps in flushing out toxins from the body. It aids digestion and is a good source of vitamin K, potassium, antioxidants, and flavonoids.11 Make it a part of your soups and salads, or you can stir-fry them and include them as a side dish in your diet.
    10. Mint: Known for its refreshing flavor, mint is widely used as a freshening agent in recipes. It has been used traditionally to help with digestive conditions.12 As mint gives a cooling effect, it can be easily added to summer beverages such as juices, milkshakes, teas, or infused in water and enjoyed as a refreshing summer treat.

Please don’t forget to keep your refrigerator stocked with these vegan food items in order to help avoid dehydration and fully enjoy the summer heat.

Happy Summer!

 

References

  1. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Watermelon, raw.
  2. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Melon, Cantaloupe, raw.
  3. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Pineapple, raw.
  4. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Cucumber, peeled, raw.
  5. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Squash, summer, zucchini, includes skin, raw.
  6. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Oranges, raw, with peel.
  7. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Nuts, coconut water.
  8. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Onions, raw
  9. Phytotherapy research. 2002 Nov 1;16(7):603-15.
  10. Critical reviews in food science and nutrition. 2015 Jan 2;55(1):50-66.
  11. National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Legacy Release. United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service: Celery, raw.
  12. Arch. Clin. Microbiol. 2017;8(4):54.